We at Health and Healing Therapy want to give you the opportunity to get to know our therapists, what their clients struggle with, how they help, and who they are. We believe that connection and comfort with your therapist is vital to growth and healing, so we hope that knowing more about us can put you to ease and assist you in making a decision about whether we are the right therapy practice for you. To do so, we have interviewed each of our therapists about themselves, their careers, and their thoughts around therapy.

Next in the spotlight, we have Reshma Lagomarcino LCPC who talks about how therapy is a form of grounding, the importance of being your authentic self, and the things she typically helps her clients with.

Why do you think it’s important for people to participate in therapy?

I think it really helps with grounding and just slowing down, and I think that especially now with everything kind of going on with COVID, we especially need it to slow down and take a pause. It helps us regulate, and I think everyone can use some of that.

What does a therapy session with you look like?

It depends, but usually I’m looking at clients’ strengths, any areas that they’re resilient in, and we can typically come up with a few. I also introduce some coping skills if they need them, and I like to bring humor into the sessions, too.

What is the best advice you’ve given in a therapy session?

To be your most authentic self. So, not thinking about what others want or what your parents or peers want and how they want you to act, but stopping, thinking about, and answering the questions: What do you want, and who are you, really? And then, going about your day as that person. Being who you most feel you are and who you want to be.

What is one of the hardest parts of being a therapist?

I think that it might be some of the unexpected things that come up, and I think that’s because life happens. So, as much as I think somebody’s doing really well and I know how a session’s going to go, something could have come up in their lives, or they might have discovered something, whether it was a loss or a betrayal, and it kind of sets them back a little bit. I’m not always expecting that to come up.

What do you like the most about being a therapist?

I think it’s seeing growth in my clients, and I think that’s something we get to see in a private practice. I like seeing the progress they’ve made as they continue to do the work.

What are common challenges that your clients face? What is an area or are areas of specialty you have?

I think anxiety is a big one that’s coming up for a lot of clients right now. For specialties, I would say trauma, PTSD, and then for an age group I like working with, it would be adolescents and adults. That’s kind of the bulk of what my typical clients look like.

What do you want/is your hope for your clients?

I hope that they see their potential, how resilient they are and their strengths, because I think that a lot of times they come in and they’re feeling so down that they forget that they’re really strong, that they’re strong people, or that they have a lot of positive traits. I’m hoping that they’re able to see that after some work. Typically, I think they do get to see it! It can take longer for some than others, but that’s my hope – that they’re able to realize and recognize that potential in themselves.

What do clients say about working with you?

I’m hoping it’s good stuff! I hear a lot of “I appreciate that you’re here.”